11 October 2012

$15 Apple Pie

Apple Pie
Probably one of my best pies of all time. The crust cooperated, the filling set up nicely, and the bottom crust was fully cooked! I don't know what my problem is, but I have great difficulty getting the bottom to brown. More on that later.

My pie baking adventure began with a trip to Chef Central for supplies. Chef Central is a wonderful store filled with everything a baking and cooking enthusiast could need! I splurged on a really nice rolling pin, though I kept on budget for the rest of the items on my list - 9-inch glass pie dish, pastry cutter, stainless steel bowl (for the pie dough), measuring cup, and fruit peeler. I could have spent all day in there if not for my bank account.

Apple Pie
I followed Cassie's recipe for spicy cinnamon apple pie. However, I've always had problems with the crust spreading out of shape no matter how long it was chilled, so I decided to leave out the baking powder in her recipe. It worked!

Apple Pie
Apple Pie
Another issue I have when it comes to apple pies is that the apples aren't always tender after baking and the filling is usually runny. This recipe precooks the apples on the stove just until the slices begin to soften. Because the apples are precooked, I sliced them into 1/4-inch thick slices so that the individual slices would be retained after baking.

Since I forgot to buy corn starch, I replaced it with 1/2 cup flour, and I increased the cinnamon to a tablespoon. I brushed the top with a beaten egg and didn't sprinkle any sugar on top, which isn't noteworthy for any reason other than to remember exactly what I did.

Apple Pie
Pro tip to self: Lattice strips need to be longer in order to cover all the apples in this pie.

Apple Pie
After about an hour of baking, the pie looked wonderful, albeit a bit browned around the edges (I forgot foil). It smelled so apple pie-like that I wanted to slice it up right away; I resisted, and let it cool or a few hours. When it came time for dessert, I sliced into the best pie I've ever made. The bottom crust had fully browned, the filling was set, and the apples were tart with just enough sweetness. The crust was crispy and buttery.

There are two differences that I feel contributed to the success of this pie. 1. It was baked in a gas oven. I'm not sure if this really makes a difference, but I've baked many a pie in an electric oven, pumpkin, cherry, plum, blind crust, etc., and the bottom never really browns. I've used this same exact pie dough, too. 2. The filling, which was cooked for just a little bit, kept the bottom crust from getting soggy. 3. The gaps in the lattice crust allowed moisture to evaporate. I don't really know.

This pie received the highest praise from everyone who ate a slice, especially Alex, who said the pie was worth at least $15. So, I highly suggest this recipe to you; you will not be disappointed.

11 comments:

  1. Wow! The crust looks amazing! I would pay $15 for this pie. I like the tip about precooking the apples. I'm not a big pie person but this looks mouth watering. =)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Everyone needs a slice of pie every now and again!

      Delete
  2. A positively gorgeous apple pie. Wow, you do beautiful work! Enjoy the fall baking season! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Jean! I most certainly will.

      Delete
  3. i've made a few pies but never with a lattice top. this is gorgeous!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't do it often because it means less crust, but I like getting fancy every now and again.

      Delete
  4. $15?! You think you're too good to go to Wal-mart?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. More importantly, what do you think?

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Thanks for taking the time to comment. Your thoughts are appreciated! ^,^

~Christina

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